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cobbe portrait of southampton

Except where otherwise specified, all written commentary is © 2016, Hugh Macrae Richmond Shakespeare’s friend, fellow partner and player Richard Burbage (who was something of a painter of portraits, perhaps even his own) painted a portrait of Shakespeare. The link shows the face in the Cobbe portrait morphed into the face in the Droeshout engraving from the First Folio. The Cobbe portrait is a panel painting displayed at Hatchlands Park in Surrey. Both dedications were addressed to Henry Wriothesley, The Earl of … Alec Cobbe, an art restorer who inherited the piece, realized it might be a portrait of Shakespeare after he visited the National Portrait Gallery Shakespeare exhibit. The painting has been in the Cobbe family for centuries, through its marital link to Shakespeare's only literary patron, Henry Wriothesley, the 3rd Earl of Southampton. Discovered in 2006, researchers at the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust claimed in 2009 that it is a painting of Shakespeare, painted from life. After extensive infra-red and x-ray test analysis including growth-ring testing of the panel on which the portrait is painted, scientists have estimated that the panel is from around 1610. The trust's director, Diana Owen, called it a "momentous, historical and fascinating event". Portrait said to be Shakespeare unveiled, "Is This a Shakespeare Which I See Before Me? In the eighteenth century the Cobbe family … Mr Cobbe concluded that the Folger portrait, whose authenticity has been doubted for decades, was a copy of the one that had been in his family’s art collection since the mid-18th century. The Cobbe family inherited the painting from an ancestor who was married to the Earl of Southampton. But now, after an intense two months of research, Mr. Cobbe says he believes he has found the earliest extant portrait of Henry Wriothesley, Third Earl of Southampton… Photograph: Oli Scarff/Getty Images. A new exhibition of Elizabethan clothing and cross-dressing in Shakespeare opens at Shake- "Cobbe Portrait" William Shakespeare "The research conclusively demonstrates that the Cobbe picture is the prime version of the portrait and establishes beyond reasonable doubt its descent to the Cobbes through their cousin’s marriage to the great granddaughter of Shakespeare’s only literary patron, Henry Wriothesley, the 3rd Earl of Southampton. "[20] The word for "beware" (or danger[ous]) is not, however present in the inscription, so it literally translates as "friendships of Princes". the new portrait (illustrated in several color plates), together with another piece in the Cobbe collection - a portrait believed to be Shakespeare s patron, the earl of Southampton, as a young man - first brought to the publics attention in 2002* This leads to discussions by … The coincidence of distinctive features, the extraordinarily long hair, the high forehead, the long nose terminating in a bulb and the slender upper lip with known portraits of Henry Wriothesley, … tractas et incedis per ignis It, or more likely a copy such as the Janssen, is possibly the source of Martin Droeshout's familiar engraving on the title page of the Shakespeare First Folio (1623). It has descended in the Cobbe collection for nearly three hundred years together with a portrait of his only literary patron, Henry Wriothesley, 3rd Earl of Southampton, to whom it probably belonged. [11][12] Wells said: The evidence that it represents Shakespeare and that it was done from life, though it is circumstantial, is in my view overwhelming. While I don't place a lot of credence in the validity of this technique in general, this instance highlights the similarities between the faces -- specifically as the author says: the eyes. The collection of Old Masters has its origins in the 18th century, when members of the Cobbe family collected a large number of Italian and Dutch paintings for the handsome villa near Dublin, Newbridge House. In 2002, a portrait in the Cobbe collection was identified as a portrait of the youthful Earl. The portrait, named "The Cobbe Portrait of William Shakespeare," was painted in 1610 and shows the dramatist at the age of 42, six years before his death. [18], Wells and his colleagues have responded to the criticisms, arguing that David Piper's original 1964 identification of the Janssen as Overbury was based on the misreading of an inventory. [15] Dr Tarnya Cooper, curator of 16th century portraits at the National Portrait Gallery, also voiced scepticism. They refer to ‘the alliances of Princes’ – perhaps to be taken as an allusion to the Earl of Essex’s rising of 1601 in which Southampton was closely involved and which led to Essex’s execution and Southampton’s imprisonment. 'Codswallop' says expert", "To find the mind's construction in the face: The great Shakespeare debate", "Much Ado About Nothing: why the Cobbe portrait is not an authentic, true-to-life portrait of William Shakespeare", "Historic 400-year-old Shakespeare portrait unveiled", Website comparing alleged Shakespeare portraits, Article by the BBC on the Droeshout and Cobbe portraits, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Cobbe_portrait&oldid=990527541, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, You are writing on the civil disturbances during the consulship of. The portrait includes the Latin legend Principum amicitias! principum amicitias et arma Artist unknown. Southampton has been identified as, possibly, the "fair youth" of Shakespeare's sonnets. On 28 February 1607, Anne married Grey Brydges. The Cobbe portrait (1610), The Chandos portrait (early 1600s) and the Droeshout portrait (1622): three of the most prominent of the reputed portraits of William Shakespeare. ", "A portrait of William Shakespeare? [3] Although many details of the doublet and collar are eliminated in the engraving, the angle and length of the arms, the shape of the fabric at the shoulders, and the length of the torso, all show a greater resemblance in the Janssen. A lot of people have the wrong image of Shakespeare, and I'm pleased that the picture confirms my own feelings — this is the portrait … Life. Cobbe portrait of Southampton. The Cobbe portrait is an early Jacobean panel painting of a gentleman which has been argued to be a life portrait of William Shakespeare.It is displayed at Hatchlands Park in Surrey, a National Trust property, and the portrait is so-called because of its historical ownership by Archbishop Charles Cobbe (1686-1765). He was educated at Winchester College and Trinity College, Oxford.. Charles Cobbe's maternal grandfather James Chaloner was Governor of the Isle of Man from 1658 to 1660. The claims regarding this portrait follow from research into another portrait in Alec Cobbe's collection, which came to public attention in 2002 when the painting, apparently depicting a young woman, was provisionally identified as a … The image is in the Public Domain, and tagged Portraits and Allegory. The Cobbe portrait is not a genuine likeness of William Shakespeare made from life Confirmed by four expert opinions ... First Minister of Elizabeth I (Hatfield House, c. 1600); and the third Earl of Southampton (Tower Portrait, Duke of Buccleuch Collection, after 1603). The Cobbe portrait is an unattributed panel painting of a 17th century gentleman. "He's very well dressed. In the exhibition catalogue the "Janssen portrait" was tentatively identified as a depiction of the courtier, poet and essayist Thomas Overbury. [14], Sir Roy Strong, former director of the Victoria and Albert Museum and the National Portrait Gallery, and a leading scholar of Elizabethan and Jacobean portraiture, has called Wells's claims "codswallop". Cobbe was the second son of Thomas Cobbe, of Swarraton, Winchester, Receiver General for County Southampton, by his marriage to Veriana Chaloner. Over the years there have been many false alarms on images of Shakespeare, including the Chandos portrait in the National Portrait Gallery. Wells and Cobbe are writing a book on Southampton and Shakespeare. The Cobbe portrait, as it is known, has been in the family of Alec Cobbe for centuries. Even experts at the gallery doubt its authenticity. Of Wells's identification of the sitter as Shakespeare, she said, "I respect Wells's scholarship enormously, but portraiture is a very different area, and this doesn't add up."[16]. Their claims, however, will cause controversy, especially since some experts doubt the Janssen portrait is Shakespeare. "It might be a portrait of Shakespeare, but not a likeness, because the convention of portraiture at the time was often to idealise the subject", he said. In 2002 a portrait in the Cobbe collection was identified as a portrait of the youthful Earl. The Cobbe family came into possession of the painting through a cousin’s marriage to the great-granddaughter of Henry Wriothesley, the 3rd Earl of Southampton. The collection of Old Masters originated in the 18th century with Archbishop Charles Cobbe (1686 – 1765) who collected a large number of Italian and Dutch paintings for his home, Newbridge House near Dublin. Support for the identification is drawn from several strands of evidence: The identification has received support from Shakespeare scholars Stanley Wells, Henry Woudhuysen, Jay L. Halio, Stuart Sillars, and Gregory Doran, chief associate director of the Royal Shakespeare Company, and art historians Alastair Laing, curator of paintings and sculpture at the National Trust, and Paul Joannides, professor of Art History at Cambridge. "If I had to bet, I would say it's not Shakespeare", Kastan said. The Cobbe Collection doesn’t stop with the musical instruments, there’s also a group of remarkable paintings to discover. Cobbe portrait of Henry Wriothesley, The Earl of Southampton (1590-1593) (click on image to enlarge) Dedication page of The Rape of Lucrece (1593-1594) (click on image to enlarge) Shakespeare wrote only two dedications and both were attached to long narrative poems Venus and Adonis (1592-1593) and The Rape of Lucrece (1593-1594). The Cobbe portrait, along with other relevant material, will go on show to the public at The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust in Stratford-upon-Avon from 23 April, Shakespeare’s birthday, in an exhibition curated jointly by Mark Broch and Dr Paul Edmondson, Curator of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust. Source They were inherited by Archbishop Cobbe (1686 – 1765) whose childless cousin had married a great … "A Life Portrait at Last: Portraits, Poet, Patron, Poems", The Cobbe Foundation and the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, 2009. In 2002, art restorer Alec Cobbe, joint heir of the Cobbe estate, was at the National Portrait Gallery's Searching for Shakespeare exhibition and came upon a painting known as the Folger portrait, which itself, until 70 years ago, had been thought to be a life portrait of Shakespeare. Other scholars have noted numerous differences between the Cobbe portrait and the authentic but posthumous Droeshout engraving that appeared in the First Folio of Shakespeare's works.[5]. The portrait then returns to the Cobbe family, which inherited it when an ancestor married England's Earl of Southampton -- a friend of Shakespeare who likely commissioned its painting. Both this portrait and a recently identified portrait of Shakespeare's patron and dedicatee, Henry Wriothesley, 3rd Earl of Southampton, were inherited by Archbishop Charles Cobbe (1686-1765). In Horace's context they form part of a sentence meaning "beware the alliances of princes. the figure between the engraving and the Janssen copy. The Cobbe portrait bears a Latin inscription, taken from a poem by Horace, addressed to a playwright. She noted the opinion of Eberhard J. Nikitsch, a specialist in inscriptions, who said that the script of the painting's inscription was not commonly used in early 17th-century portraits, and that it must have been added later. Bearman also expresses scepticism about the link with Shakespeare's patron Wriothesley. Was he more than just good friends with the man who commissioned the painting, his patron the Earl of Southampton? The Cobbe Portrait. "Shakespeare Unfound(ed)? Research using tracings by Rupert Featherstone at the Hamilton Kerr Institute, University of Cambridge, has led him to conclude that the Cobbe portrait and the only documented portrait of Overbury in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, depict two different sitters. The picture of the Earl of Southampton, featuring a figure with long, black curly hair, pursed red lips, an earring and a slender right hand, has prompted speculation in British media that Shakespeare was gay. They also assert that the hairline was altered before 1630, because another copy of that date already showed the balding forehead. The painting has been in the Cobbe family for centuries, through its marital link to Shakespeare's only literary patron, Henry Wriothesley, the 3rd Earl of Southampton. Rachel Wriothesley, Countess of Southampton as Fortune is a Neoclassical Oil on Canvas Painting created by Anthony van Dyck in 1630. Features such as a distinctive bushy hairline, and a slightly malformed left ear that may once have borne the weight of a jewelled earring, appear identical. The highest-resolution version is File:Cobbe portrait 2009-03-09.jpg; the highest-quality low-resolution one is probably File:Shakespeare 1610.jpg. I feel in little doubt that this is a portrait of Shakespeare, done from life and commissioned by the Earl of Southampton. Cobbe Portrait of Southampton.jpg 1,732 × 2,250; 2.6 MB The Cobbe portrait. The real identity of the sitter for the new 'Shakespeare' portrait", Randall L. B. McNeill, Horace: Image, Identity, and Audience, JHU Press, 2001, pp.128–9, Church of Ireland (Anglican) Archbishop of Dublin, Henry Wriothesley, 3rd Earl of Southampton, "William Shakespeare portrait in Irish home painted from life, say experts", https://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/theatre/5019141/William-Shakespeare-portrait-could-be-16th-century-courtier.html, Title page of the First Folio with Droeshout's engraved portrait of Shakespeare, Folger Shakespeare Library: Janssen portrait, "The only true painting of Shakespeare – probably", "Unique portrait from Shakespeare's life unveiled", "The Bard? In deciding between the Cobbe original and one of its copies as a source for the engraving, Wells draws attention to a greater similarity in the shape of The Cobbe portrait of Southampton goes on display today at Hatchlands Park, East Clandon, Surrey (01483 222482), 2-5pm Sundays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and … An illustrated catalogue provides details of the painting and its provenance.[3]. The Cobbe portrait is displayed together with a youthful portrait of his only known literary patron, Henry Wriothesley, 3rd Earl of Southampton, to whom the Bard dedicated his two great poems (Venus and Adonis and The Rape of Lucrece) and possibly some of the Sonnets. The fact that this alternation was made, in part, to reverse an earlier alteration to the hairline in the Cobbe suggests to Wells that it was made independently, and that the Janssen copy may have been used as a source for the engraving in this aged state. Both the Shakespeare portrait and the painting of the earl were inherited by Archbishop Charles Cobbe (1686-1765). Support for this theory is drawn from the inheritance of the portrait by the Cobbe family from Shakespeare's patron, Henry Wriothesley, 3rd Earl of Southampton, and its resemblance to the Janssen portrait, a long-standing … Cobbe portraitFile:Cobbe portrait 2009-03-09.jpgFile:Shakespeare 1610.jpgCommons policy The Cobbe portrait, as the scholars now call it, shows a head-turner of a man. Matt Cossolotto sent this link from a fellow Oxfordian that he said could be shared "at will". The Cobbe family is an Irish landed family.The family has a notable history, [1] and has produced several prominent Irish politicians, clergymen, writers, activists and soldiers, such as writer and social reformer Frances Power Cobbe, and General Sir Alexander Cobbe VC. Since the publicity surrounding it, the portrait has appeared on the covers of several books, and even inspired the Chinese author Zhang Yiyi to have a series of cosmetic surgeries to have his face transformed into that of Shakespeare. The Cobbe portrait is the newest portrait discovered by historians to purport to represent William Shakespeare. Portraits By British Artists Cobbe Portr [10] However, the state of the painting that Cobbe viewed was not the one that showed the greatest resemblance to the standard engraved Droeshout image of Shakespeare with a high, balding forehead. The painting has hung on the walls of properties owned by the Cobbe family for about 300 years. The portrait is thought to have been commissioned by Shakespeare's patron, Henry Wriothesley, 3rd Earl of Southampton. Cobbe family Last updated January 09, 2020. Showing of Two Recently Identified Works: The "Cobbe Portrait" of Shakespeare and a Sixteenth-Century Painting of Shakespeare's Patron, the 3rd Earl of Southampton In April 2008, a rare portrait, believed to be of Southampton has been discovered using X-ray technology. Media in category "Henry Wriothesley, 3rd Earl of Southampton" The following 11 files are in this category, out of 11 total. nondum expiatis uncta cruoribus, The painting will be on display for several months before it is returned to the Cobbe family. [13], Other experts are even more sceptical, and suggest that even the circumstantial evidence is weak. But even if it were, he said, the traditions of Elizabethan portraiture meant that it would be unwise to conclude that Shakespeare actually looked like the figure depicted in the portrait. It was for many years believed to be of Sir Walter Raleigh, and it bears a label on the reverse to this effect. [17], Hildegard Hammerschmidt-Hummel wrote that the Cobbe portrait was not an authentic likeness of Shakespeare. Its dramatic discovery will ignite a new debate about the playwright’s sexuality THROUGHOUT56-year-old Alec Cobbe’s childhood, and well into his middle age, the picture that had been in his family some 300 years had been consigned [22] The portrait is the earliest extant oil portrait of the androgynous-looking youthful Earl to survive and shows him at the time that Shakespeare dedicated his long poems Venus and Adonis (1593) and The Rape of Lucrece (1594) to him. This page was last edited on 25 November 2020, at 00:16. Both the Cobbe portrait and the Janssen copy received alterations, in particular to the hairline. The Cobbe portrait of Southampton goes on display today at Hatchlands Park,East Clandon, Surrey (01483 222482),2-5pm Sundays,Tues-days,Wednesdays,Thursdays and Bank Holidays to the end of October. It was presented publicly to the world in 2006, after spending many years in the possession of a family collection. It seems likely the Earl of Southampton commissioned the Cobbe portrait, emphasising once more his closeness to Shakespeare. Shakespeare is one of the subjects, using the Cobbe portrait of 1610, in which Shakespeare, is splendidly dressed in aristocratic clothes, like the wealthy man he was by 1610. In a review of the exhibition catalogue edited by Wells, Robert Bearman writes: "It is strongly argued that there is a striking resemblance between the newly discovered portrait (or, rather, a copy) and the Droeshout engraving of Shakespeare, and that the painting might itself have been used by Droeshout." ludumque Fortunae grauisque It lives at the The Cobbe Collection in England. See Cobbe portrait for information about this work. The Cobbe Portrait is an unattributed panel painting of William Shakespeare painted from memory,believed by some to be the only surviving painting of Shakespeare. Pictures were added over the centuries, and the collection continues to grow. While acknowledging that the Janssen portrait and the Cobbe portrait are versions of the same image, she believes it likely that both portraits represent Sir Thomas Overbury. Heritage Images/Hulton Archive/Getty Images Henry, Earl of Oxenford, Henry, Earle of Southampton, Robert, Earl of Essex (1624). It is displayed at Hatchlands Park in Surrey, a National Trust property, and the portrait is so-called because of its ownership by Charles Cobbe, Church of Ireland (Anglican) Archbishop of Dublin (1686–1765). Shakespeare's age and date had also been added at some later time. The subject of the portrait was unidentified for centuries after passing into the ownership of the Cobbe family some time in the early 18th century. Yesterday, the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust chose the grand Mayfair base of the English Speaking Union to unveil what they are convinced is the only authentic image of Shakespeare made from life. According to Stanley Wells[3] the portrait has been in the possession of the Cobbe family since the early 18th century and is most likely a portrait of Shakespeare. Alastair Laing of the National Trust wrote at the time that, "I am very happy indeed about the identification. Over a three-year period, a research project headed by Stanley Wells and Alastair Laing, performed a number of authentication studies on the portrait. They also suggested that the "Janssen portrait" was a copy of the Cobbe portrait. Research suggests painting is the only portrait from life, leading expert says, The painting now believed to be of William Shakespeare has hung on the walls of the Cobbe family for about 300 years. Scientific testing has shown that the portrait is painted on a panel of English oak sometime after 1595; the form of the collar suggests a painting date of around 1610. … the earliest known portrait of the third Earl of Southampton, Shakespeare’s patron and possible lover. The link shows the face in the Cobbe portrait morphed into the face in the Droeshout engraving from the First Folio. This picture bears a startling resemblance to the "Cobbe" painting (and its companions). The result is the firm belief that the Folger painting is a copy of the Cobbe original. Even the man's beautifully intricate lace collar, though not identical in pattern, shares overall design with "Cobbe", having square rather than rounded corners. For many people he is the round-headed bald man seen on the First Folio of his collected works but evidence was presented yesterday arguing that we should rethink this. This suggestion dates back to an earlier exhibition in 1964, before the cleaning. En 2009, Stanley Wells y la Shakespeare Birthplace Trust presentan esta pintura, que pertenece a la familia Cobbe desde comienzos del siglo XVIII, como un posible retrato de Shakespeare hacia 1610. [6] The removal of overpainting in 1988 had, in fact, revealed an earlier state with a much younger hairline. Given the connection to Shakespeare and his sonnets, it is a very, very exciting discovery. Not all Shakespeare scholars are convinced the Cobbe portrait is an authentic likeness — or even that it depicts Shakespeare at all. The coincidence of distinctive features, the extraordinarily long hair, the high forehead, the long nose terminating in a bulb and the slender upper lip with known portraits of Henry Wriothesley, 3rd Earl of Southampton, led to the conclusion that it depicted Shakespeare's patron the 3rd Earl of Southampton himself, whose great-granddaughter was Lady Elizabeth Norton. ... that suggestion has hinged mostly on dedications to the Earl of Southampton … The Cobbe original was only identified in the collection of the Anglo-Irish Cobbe family in 2006, and had until then been completely unknown to the world. [6] The alteration to the hairline of the Janssen must date before 1770, when an engraving was made of the painting in its altered state, but its timing relative to the production of the Droeshout engraving is unknown. The Cobbe portrait is displayed together with a youthful portrait of his only known literary patron, Henry Wriothesley, 3rd Earl of Southampton, to whom the Bard dedicated his two great poems (Venus and Adonis and The Rape of Lucrece) and possibly some of the Sonnets. The fact that the word "friendships" appears in the accusative case in the inscription (rather than in the nominative, as one would expect if it were to stand alone), underscores the fact that the inscription was meant to allude to the passage in Horace 2.1. bellique causas et uitia et modos Instead we should visualise Shakespeare as a rosy-cheeked, long-nosed man who was something of a looker. [2] The portrait has been the centrepiece of two exhibitions dedicated to it: Shakespeare Found: a Life Portrait at the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, Stratford-upon-Avon, from April–October 2009 and The Changing Face of William Shakespeare at the Morgan Library and Museum, New York, from February–May 2011. The Morgan Library & Museum Presents Exhibition Focusing on the Controversial Shakespeare Portrait Question Includes First U.S. ... the third earl of Southampton … Historia. The Cobbe portrait of Shakespeare is inscribed with the words Principum Amicitias, a quotation from an ode by Horace that was dedicated to a playwright. The Earl has often been suggested as the "Fair Youth" who is the love object in some of Shakespeare's sonnets. Portrait paintings of William ShakespearePortrait paintings of men by titleCharles Cobbe. Jan 22, 2015 - Henry Wriothesley, 3rd Earl of Southampton (1573-1624). As the press release describes, the portrait arrived with the Cobbes “through their cousin’s marriage to the great granddaughter of Shakespeare’s only literary patron, Henry Wriothesley, the 3rd Earl of Southampton” and this, indeed, is the chief attraction of the Cobbe portrait to Professor Wells. That the painting looks more like a 26-year-old than a 46-year-old - Shakespeare's age when it was likely painted - may be down to the convention of the time when a painter should "polish out the wrinkles and increase the size of the pearls," according to Mark Broch, curator of the Cobbe collection. An icon used to represent a menu that can be toggled by interacting with this icon. The Earl was a great friend of Shakespeare's and was probably was the one who commissioned the portrait. [1] Many scholars dismiss this theory and have provided evidence to identify the portrait as one of Sir Thomas Overbury. He contacted Wells, who, despite his initial doubt, arranged for the painting to undergo the rigorous scientific analysis that would determine its validity. Duncan-Jones, Katherine. This is speculated[20] to be a quotation from Horace's Odes, book 2, ode 1 (below), where the words are addressed to Asinius Pollio, who, among other things, was a poet and playwright. The similarities between the two were obvious and Cobbe rang Wells immediately, setting in motion more than two years of extensive art historical, literary and scientific research. Portraits By British Artists Cobbe Portr [LLC, Books] on Amazon.com.au. "The Cobbe portrait will show people a man who was of high social status," says Wells. Over the years there have … [8], Cobbe sought advice from the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust. [7] Nevertheless, the catalogue asserted that this was simply a guess. Cobbe was the second son of Thomas Cobbe, of Swarraton, Winchester, Receiver General for County Southampton, by his marriage to Veriana Chaloner. Stanley Wells, editor. They counter Duncan-Jones's argument that the costume is too aristocratic for Shakespeare by comparing it to that worn by Shakespeare's colleague and collaborator John Fletcher in a portrait of the period.[19]. suppositos cineri doloso. In 2002 a portrait in the Cobbe collection was identified as a portrait of the youthful Earl (see below), now known as the Cobbe portrait of Southampton. Wells and Laing concluded that sufficient circumstantial evidence exists to announce the project's findings. Hatchlands Park, Surrey, UK. Shakespeare scholar David Scott Kastan also took the view that there were reasons to question the Cobbe portrait's provenance – whether it was in fact once owned by the Earl of Southampton or commissioned by him, as the Trust representatives believe – and to doubt whether the richly dressed man in the portrait was Shakespeare. painted above the sitter's head. It is possible the Earl may have wanted a more flattering image. temporada 2014/2015 www.teatrelliure.cat 2 Montjuïc - 6 d’octubre Love for Shakespeare direcció Lluís Pasqual intèrprets Laura Conejero / Maria Hinojosa / Míriam Iscla / Maika Makovski / Laia In 2006, Alec Cobbe viewed the "Janssen portrait", so-called because it was once attributed to the artist Cornelis Janssen. *FREE* shipping on eligible orders. Portrait of a Woman in Black and a Large Cartwheel Ruff, Holding a Glove Hendrik Gerritsz. Showing him as an androgynous-looking young man, it is now known as the Cobbe portrait of Southampton. The Cobbe portrait is an early Jacobean panel painting of a gentleman which has been argued to be a life portrait of William Shakespeare. The claims regarding this portrait follow from research into another portrait in the Cobbe collection, also displayed at Hatchlands Park, which came to public attention in 2002 when the painting, which for three centuries had been identified as a portrait of a woman, "Lady Norton", was correctly identified as a portrait of a young man. It is also likely to have been used by the teenage engraver who produced one of the most recognisable of Shakespeare images - the copper engraving of a bald, round-headed man on the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays, published in 1623. Writing in The Times Literary Supplement Shakespeare biographer Katherine Duncan-Jones also favours the identification of the subject as Overbury: An authentic portrait of Sir Thomas Overbury (1581–1613) was bequeathed to the Bodleian Library in Oxford in 1740. Showing him as an androgynous-looking young man, it is now known as the Cobbe portrait of Southampton. As is detailed in the catalogue of the 2009 exhibition "Shakespeare Found", several other early copies of the Cobbe portrait have been located and no less than three of them have independent traditions as portraits of Shakespeare.[3]. He's wearing a very beautiful and expensive Italian lace collar. англисче: The Cobbe Portrait of WillIam Shakespeare (1564-1616) title QS:P1476,en:"The Cobbe Portrait of WillIam Shakespeare (1564-1616) " label QS:Len,"The Cobbe Portrait of WillIam Shakespeare (1564-1616) "

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